Sorry about that…

well, not really.

I’m referring to yesterday’s annual April Fool’s Day post, in which I “reported” Obamacare would include a single-payer federal workers’ comp system for small employers.  While some chalk it up to my sophomoric attempt at humor, (and they would be right), there’s another, more important takeaway, one that is particularly relevant in the work comp industry.

There’s a lot of mis-information out there, much in the form of reports, statistics, metrics, findings, research, and it often goes unchallenged.  Here are a couple examples.

“Research” published by benefits giant AFLAC claims companies that set up voluntary disability programs saw reductions in work comp claims.  Except the “research” is not credible, isn’t reproducible, is based on nothing more than opinion, and therefore is just marketing BS. (hat tip to Mark Larsen of WorkCompCentral for the info)

The key here is don’t believe “research” unless it is credible, which means there was a solid methodology (asking people their opinion then drawing a statistical conclusion from those opinions is NOT a solid methodology).

Vendor claims that they can “save” X% more than your current vendor on pharmacy/medical bills/provider costs/whatever are often – but not always – pure speculation.  Fact is, unless the vendor making the claim really, really understands what your current program/vendor is doing, how they are doing it, the methodology they are using to calculate results, and reviews the bill/provider/script data, their claims are suspect at best.

That’s not to say that some programs don’t deliver measurably better performance, but unless the vendor pitching you can provide a detailed analysis of why and how they can do better, they’re just blowing smoke.  How can you figure this out?  Simple – ask lots of questions – starting with how, when, who, how much, where.  Dig deep and do not be satisfied with generic marketing-speak answers.

You will find some vendors are only too happy to get into the details, while others get really uncomfortable.  And that tells you a lot about their REAL ability to deliver.

Finally, the April Fool’s post caught more than a few readers, so if you were one, you’re in pretty good company (there were several clients and a few regulators – all shall remain nameless – who fell for it).

What does this mean for you?

Don’t be an April – or any other month – fool.

 

One thought on “Sorry about that…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>