The future of Managed Care Matters

MCM has been up and running for more than a dozen years, over 3,000 posts, and multiple iterations. We average about 1400 visitors each day we post.

It’s time to review what we do and see what needs to change.

Not to worry (or cheer, depending on your view) It’s not going away.  Nope, we’re going to continue doing what we do – reporting what we think is important; calling out the bad actors; applauding the good folks; digging into the details; and challenging you, dear reader, to think more deeply.

This is more important now than ever.

The American health care system  – patients, providers, payers, suppliers, intermediaries – accounts for one out of every six dollars in our economy.  17 percent plus of our GDP. Almost three trillion dollars. Likely 20 million + jobs, many of them well-paid.

As we’ve seen with ACA, changing this “system” is wrenching indeed. It’s incredibly politically charged, stupidly expensive, delivers poor results for what we pay, brutally hard to explain, and stuffed with great reasons to not change. Oh, and there are more lobbyists focused on pharma, medical devices, insurance, providers and health systems than for everything else combined (I kinda guessed at that last one, but it’s likely true).

After the most bizarre and unpredictable election in memory, it’s now the Republicans’ turn.  Reforming 1/6th of the nation’s economy is challenging indeed, and we all hope they get it right, as there is so much at stake.

For my work comp readers, we’re used to being the flea on the tail of the elephant. When you buy just 1.25% of all the health care services in the country, you get used to being whipped around and having almost no ability to choose where you go.

Make no mistake, the “reform of health reform” will dramatically affect workers comp.

Here’s what’s happening at MCM.

  1. All comments will be moderated.  After a raft of nasty comments from a very few posters it’s no longer advisable to let comments go “live” without moderation.
  2. We’re adding a new category – Health reform’s impact on worker’s comp. You can see those categories on the right side of the home page, where all posts are neatly categorized. Just click on the one you want and voila!
  3. As always, courteous, intelligent, and fact-based disagreement is welcome. If you want to take issue with a post or specific content cite primary sources to back up your statements and claims. Unsupported rants will not be posted.
  4. Anonymous comments may or may not be posted.  You know who I am, it’s only fair I – and other readers – know who you are.

In January, we’re launching a periodic podcast which will focus on key issues, update you on deals and transactions, provide context on health reform, and answer your questions.  Will keep you updated on that – it’s been a long time in coming!

 

 

 

11 thoughts on “The future of Managed Care Matters

  1. Joe, do not know what I would do without MCM. Professional, provocative, stimulating and intelligent conversation about things that matter. Keep on Keeping on and thank you for being you.

  2. thank you for this information stream. I enjoy reading your comments. and I do understand why the changes and am saddened that they are necessary. Civility in political discourse was always a hallmark for me and I am perturbed that the level of conversation has gone this way. Please keep up your high standards and I look forward to many more years of your blog!

  3. Joe, I have been a regular reader for the better part of 10 years and always enjoy your thought provoking insight into what is happening in the industry. I appreciate your thoughtful opinions that can challenge mine. l look forward to new things you bring to the table.

  4. Joe – you provide vital discourse, intelligent insights and value everyday to all of us. Its time we said thank you, back to you as well. Love what you do, and the way you approach the issues and the often multiple points of view. Thanks for being on my computer everyday!

  5. Joe,
    Thank you for your posts; I find them valuable. As for the moderated comments, I whole heartedly support the change. There is nothing worse than a rant that has no basis in reality or facts. I appreciate opposing views and think they are necessary to keep us thinking and considering all sides as long as they have a fact based foundation.

  6. Always appreciate your posts. “calling out the bad actors; applauding the good folks; digging into the details; and challenging you, dear reader, to think more deeply.” is exactly what our industry needs. Thank you.

  7. Thanks for the transparency and openness on how you’re evolving the blog. It’s indispensable. And the podcast is a great idea — looking forward to it.

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