What the %$#(*& is going on with opioid policy?

I’m somewhat encouraged, but mostly confused.

Briefly, this is the problem with national opioid policy.

There’s a major disconnect in DC on what to do about opioids – criminalize addicts, incarcerate them, kill drug dealersor expand treatment, go after opioid manufacturers and distributors, increase funding for solutions, change Medicaid policy to allow more treatment options.

While these aren’t mutually exclusive, the messaging coming from the White House is wildly inconsistent.

[HHS Secretary] Azar’s emphasis on medication-assisted treatment for opioid abuse also stands in stark contrast to Trump, his boss, who typically focuses heavily on law enforcement whenever he’s addressing the epidemic. That’s the approach Trump took yesterday, telling summit attendees that cracking down on drug dealers is a key to solving the problem — and even suggesting that imposing the death penalty on them would be helpful.

“Some countries have a very, very tough penalty — the ultimate penalty,” the president said. “And, by the way, they have much less of a drug problem than we do. So, we’re going to have to be very strong on penalties.”

While there’s lots of press out about the recent White House confab on opioids, what’s really happened behind the scenes is a lot less exciting. It sure looks like the policy experts are being sidelined from the real work, which is being handled by, you guessed it, political types…

from Politico

[Senior White House Advisor Kelly Anne] Conway’s role [as chair of the WH “opioid cabinet] has also caused confusion on the Hill. For instance, the Senate HELP Committee’s staff has been in touch with both Conway and the White House domestic policy officials, according to chairman Lamar Alexander’s office. But lawmakers who have been leaders on opioid policy and who are accustomed to working with the drug czar office, haven’t seen outreach from Conway or her cabinet.

“I haven’t talked to Kellyanne at all and I’m from the worst state for this,” said Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, a Republican from West Virginia, which has the country’s highest overdose death rate. “I’m uncertain of her role.” The office of Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio), another leader on opioid policy, echoed…

Of course, there’s still no Director for the Office of National Drug Control Policy, but at least it isn’t being run by a 24 year old.

I’ve talked to professionals deeply involved in national drug control initiatives and policy; some are convinced Trump et al are serious about the opioid disaster and are focused on it; others say it’s all a sham, the Administration is either unable or uncaring about this, and just bounces from policy statement to policy statement without getting anything done.

My takeaway is this.

Good people in the Administration know the opioid disaster is a disaster, and want to help address it. But they can’t.

The complete and total managerial incompetence, institutional attention deficit disorder syndrome, and lack of understanding of how to govern on the part of the White House’s current occupant and his staff hamstrings any and all efforts to develop and implement solutions.

What does this mean for you?

Big problems require thoughtful and diligent approaches.

One thought on “What the %$#(*& is going on with opioid policy?

  1. its the same as sending thoughts and prayers to mass shooting victims. Talk is cheap and meaningless (and so are tweets!)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *