Prepping for Vegas

Here’s a few pointers for those in or heading to the NWCDC confab in Vegas.

1.  Realize you can’t be everywhere and do everything. Prioritize.

2.  Leave time for last-minute meetings and the inevitable chance meetings with old friends and colleagues.

3.  Unless you have a photographic memory, use your smartphone to take voice notes from each meeting – right after you’re done.  Otherwise they’ll all run together and you’ll never remember what you committed to.

4.  Get the NWCDC app for your Droid or iPhone – there’s a web-based version too for tablets.  It has the schedule, exhibit hall layout, local map, and a bunch of other handy information and tools.

5.  Introduce yourself to a dozen people you’ve never met.  This business is all about relationships and networking, and no better place to do that than this conference.

6.  Wear comfortable shoes, get your exercise in, and be professional and polished.  It’s a long three days, and you’re always ‘on’.

Finally, I’ll echo one of Sandy Blunt’s points – in these day of YouTube, phone cameras, Twitter and Google+, what you do is public knowledge.  That slick dance move or intense conversation with a private equity exec just might re-appear – to your dismay.

Why the GOP tax bill increases health insurance premiums

I received several emails from readers challenging my statement Friday that the GOP tax bill will result in higher health insurance premiums.  Here’s how.

Briefly, the Bill lets you buy health insurance after you get sick – without a penalty. It’s as if this guy was signing up for auto insurance post-crash…

Both the House and Senate versions of the bills end the penalty for those who don’t have health insurance. This penalty does 2 things; it financially penalizes those who go without coverage, and it generates funds that help pay for healthcare for others.

What the tax bills DON’T do is change the requirement that insurance companies cover anyone who applies.

Imagine if you were able to buy auto insurance after you crashed. Why would you bother to sign up and pay those premiums if you didn’t have to?

BTW, there’s a ton of research and history that shows what a bad idea this is, how much damage it does to insurance markets, and what we can expect.

Folks, this is just ONE example of the dumb ideas in this bill, from people who claim to understand how the free market works.

What does this mean for you?

Insurance rates are going to go up. 


The tax bill’s impact on healthcare or; If you like your cancer care, you can’t keep it.

The GOP “tax reform” bill will directly and significantly affect healthcare. Here’s how.

It removes the individual mandate, but still requires insurers to cover anyone who applies for insurance. So, millions will drop coverage knowing they can sign up if they get sick.

How does that make any sense?

Here’s the high-level impact of the “tax bill that is really a healthcare bill”:

The net – healthcare providers are going to get hammered, and they’re going to look to insured patients to cover their costs.

The real net – The folks most hurt by this are those in deep-red areas where there is little choice in healthcare plans, lots of struggling rural hospitals, and no other safety net.  Alaskans, Nebraskans, Iowans, Wyoming residents are among those who are going to lose access to healthcare – and lose health care providers.

Here are the details.

According to the Commonwealth Fund, “repeal would save the federal government $338 billion between 2018 and 2027, resulting from lower federal costs for premium tax credits and Medicaid. By 2027, 13 million fewer people will have health insurance, either because they decide against buying coverage or can no longer afford it.”

Most of those who drop coverage will be healthier than average, forcing insurers in the individual market to raise prices to cover care for a sicker population. This is how “death spirals” start, an event we’ve seen dozens of times in state markets, and one that is inevitable without a mandate and subsidies.

For example, older Americans would see higher increases than younger folks. Here’s how much your premiums would increase if you are in the individual marketplace.

So, what’s the impact on you?

Those 13 million who drop insurance, which include older, poorer, sicker people, will need coverage – and they’ll get it from at most expensive and least effective place – your local ER. Which you will pay for in part due to cost-shifting.

ACA provided a huge increase in funding for emergency care services – folks who didn’t have coverage before were able to get insurance from Medicaid or private insurers, insurance that paid for their emergency care.

From The Hill:

[after ACA passage] there were 41 percent fewer uninsured drug overdoses, 25 percent fewer uninsured heart attacks, and over 32 percent fewer uninsured appendectomies in 2015 compared to 2013. The total percent reduction in inpatient uninsured hospitalizations across all conditions was 28 percent lower in 2015 than in 2013. Between 2013 and 2015, Arizona saw a 25 percent reduction in state uninsured hospitalizations, Nevada a 75 percent reduction, Tennessee a 17 percent drop, and West Virginia an 86 percent decline.

If the GOP “tax bill” passes, hospital and health system charges to insureds (yes, you work comp payer) are going to increase – and/or those hospitals and health systems will go bankrupt.



HWR – it’s the Late Days of Empires

From covering our generally-mediocre-but-hugely-expensive healthcare “system” to the use of blockchain in clinical trials to why adding $ to fund healthcare subsidies would drive UP premiums, it’s all here in Andrew Sprung’s edition.

If you want to stay up to date on the healthcare stuff that will affect your business – HealthWonk Review is the best way to do just that.

Comp is getting it done on opioids.

Work comp drug costs are down 22% over the last five years.  Opioid spend dropped 16.7% last year.

That’s the key takeaway from CompPharma’s annual survey of Prescription Drug Management in Workers’ Comp.

These are truly remarkable results; payers and PBMs (mostly PBMs) have slashed over a billion dollars from pharmacy spend, cutting costs for employers and taxpayers.

There is much left to do; far too many patients still get far too many drugs. Opioid addiction is a crisis in workers’ comp, as is abuse misuse and diversion. There are still no comprehensive, completely (or even mostly) effective tools/medications/programs to help patients get off and stay off opioids.

But let’s focus on the positive. Last year, overall opioid spend in the US declined by 1 percent – while work comp cut opioid spend by almost 17 percent.

While the reduction is beyond substantial, it’s important to understand that a big chunk of this was driven by payers settling older claims, claims that have a disproportionately high drug spend. These settlements don’t “count” towards drug spend, while they do eliminate on-going dispensing and the attendant costs.

What does this mean for you?

Well done.


Purdue Pharma’s attempting to settle all state claims

Things must be getting tense in Stamford CT, headquarters of Purdue Pharma.  Reports indicate Purdue is working on a deal to resolve all state claims related to opioids.  

Remember – Oxycontin revenues to date are $31 billion and counting. 

Reports indicate Purdue’s owners, the Sackler family, have a net worth of around $14 billion.

Here’s what we’ve read so far about the legal situation:

A couple of factoids to remind us of the cause and effect of Purdue’s strategy.

So, what does this mean?

For workers’ comp payers, it is time to get together and develop a legal strategy and approach to suing opioid marketers. The human and financial damage caused by Purdue, Endo and their ilk is incalculable and continuing to grow. Without a successful legal action, employers and taxpayers will be footing the bills for decades to come.

There’s a deeper and even more troubling aspect to this.  One could argue – and with a lot of supporting data – that pharma companies figured out a way to legally addict people and get their insurance companies to pay for their drugs. 

There is no more damning indictment of the profit motive in the US healthcare system.

What does this mean for you?

Time to get moving.




Post vacation update

Back from a much-needed family trip to Sedona AZ where the mountain biking was phenomenal.

(son Cal and son-in-law Keith plus the old guy)

Here’s what happened while I was in the land of the vortices…

WCRI’s annual conference in March 2018 will be kicked off by the former head of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Dr Erica Groshen.  Always a must-do; sign up soon or risk being wait-listed for the March 22/23 event in Boston.

The latest from the brainiacs from Boston is a report on California’s work comp medical benchmarks.

Colleague and good friend Frank Pennachio of Oceanus Partners will be opining on misaligned incentives in work comp at NWCDC in Vegas next month.  Frank’s terrific delivery, vast experience and deep knowledge of how things really work in work comp will make this one of the most valuable sessions for employers.

Climate change’s effects are being felt everywhere – and the insurance industry may be the industry most affected. An excellent Harvard Business Review article illustrates the major, if not central role P&C Insurance is playing in forcing us to acknowledge the reality of human-caused climate change.

Differential pricing for high-risk areas (we’re talking about you, south Florida, and you, coastal areas) and Catastrophe bonds are just two of the ways the insurance industry is forcing businesses, governments, and individuals to deal with climate change.

Finally, NCCI’s out with it’s assessment of the 2015 decline in work comp medical costs; key takeaways (note California and New York were not included):

  • a drop in utilization of physician services was the key driver
  • inpatient facility costs increased 6 points, driven by a huge increase in very expensive inpatient stays 
  • there was LOTS of intrastate variation…

Good to be back at work – enjoy the short holiday week.

Friday catch-up

Here’s a few things I missed this week – and a big thank you to you, loyal reader.

First, thank you to all the folks who reached out publicly and privately to offer condolences on my political campaign and thank me for running. I deeply appreciate each and every one of you, and cannot thank you enough.

It’s Veteran’s Day (observed) today – thanks to all of you who have served.

Okay, here’s the big news of the week…

The death of “Obamacare” was announced prematurelyACA signups are breaking records.

Enrollment is well ahead of any previous year, as in more than 50% higher in the first few days of the month. There are likely several factors driving enrollment:

  • grassroots organizations like Get America Covered, the Indivisible ACA Signup Project are doing a great job despite the Administration’s efforts to kneecap enrollment efforts (thanks Charles Gaba)
  • Costs for bronze plans for millions of Americans are actually very affordable; while the coverage is thin the cost is almost nil, making it an obvious “no brainer”
  • Loss aversion – as I’ve noted here before, people hate losing something more than they like getting something, so Trump’s continual blathering about the death of “Obamacare” is likely reminding many that they better sign up now.

I hate Purdue Pharma

And I don’t use that word lightly.

A very well-researched and written piece in the New Yorker about Purdue Pharma and the family that gave us the opioid crisis is required reading. If you want to know why 60,000 friends, family members, and neighbors died of drug overdoses last year, here is the answer.

China is a major drug supplier

And it’s unbelievably easy to get illicit drugs sent here from China.

Why large employers are buying healthcare directly

Because the outcomes are much more consistent and much better, costs are lower, and there’s a LOT of crappy medical care out there. There’s a movement among smart buyers to STRONGLY encourage their insureds to use specific providers for specific conditions, and that movement is going to explode.

Here’s a key takeaway:

While nearly all of the 450 spine patients who presented to one of the participating centers had been recommended for surgery by providers in their home markets, only 62% of the patients were found to be suitable candidates for surgery by the COE [center of excellence] sites. Instead of unnecessary surgery, activity-based therapies, pain injections, physical therapy, or weight loss were recommended by our providers.

Vacation is next week – I won’t be posting.

Enjoy the weekend!

Back to my day job

As many readers know, I have been running for County Legislator here in Onondaga County New York – yesterday was election day, and I lost.

Results are here.

In the immortal words of Yoda, “there is no try, there is only do.”

Despite a lot of support from friends and colleagues, a massive amount of work, a very, very good campaign manager and staff, and a good message, I lost.

The regret I have is not for the hundreds of hours I put in, or the fun forgone when I knocked on doors instead of visiting with family and friends, rowing or riding my bike. The regret is many of you supported our campaign in many ways, and I did not deliver the win. This campaign was never about me, it was about making a difference for the people here, and many of you bought into that and pitched in.

I deeply appreciate your support and encouragement, kind words expertise and advice. I cannot tell you how much that meant and means to me, and I am profoundly grateful.

For now, the Paduda family is headed to Sedona Arizona for a week of family time, mountain biking, hiking, too much good wine and lots of reading the stuff that’s been piling up on the nightstand for the last nine months.

Looking forward to seeing you in Las Vegas – and thanks.