Feb
20

Hey Washington, where’s the health care fix?

It’s a hell of a lot easier to blow something up than to build a replacement.

Especially when you don’t care about a replacement.

Fact is, we – you, me, taxpayers, governments – cannot afford our current health care “system.”  And it is getting more expensive every day.

Congress and the President are continuing their efforts to weaken and hobble the ACA, and they are generally succeeding. Without enforcement of the individual mandate, fewer young folks are getting insurance, increasing premium for us oldsters. The number of Americans without health insurance is up, health care costs are rising, and future Medicare costs are escalating.

The misguided and ill-intentioned “work for Medicaid” effort is going to create a whole new governmental bureaucracy, raise costs, and have zero positive impact. Medicaid changes are going to lead to hospital closures, especially in rural areas and inner cities. 

Health care costs were $3.5 trillion last year – and they’ll top $4 billion in two years. That’s a meaningless figure – until you realize our national and your personal budget is going to get whacked.

But it’s worse than that. The bi-partisan budget deal and tax cuts will exacerbate our already-huge national debt, screwing our kids and grandkids. The biggest driver? Health care.

And Congress’ and the President’s solution is nowhere to be seen.

Where’s the “replacement” the GOP has been talking about? Where’s the “market-based solution” to our health care crisis? Where’s the plan to lower drug costs?

Have you seen anything from Congress or the President that gives you any hope they have any plan?

These politicians aren’t interested in governing, don’t care about your costs or your kids’ debt, and hope you don’t pay attention. They have no political courage, no interest in doing anything that might cost them the next election.

What does this mean for you?

Nothing good.

 

 

 

 


Jan
31

Media coverage of Amazon/Berkshire/JPMorgan misses the point.

The coverage of the JPMorgan/Amazon/Berkshire Hathaway healthcare initiative has been universal, breathless, and mostly superficial.

Scoffers, “experts” are gleefully predicting this attempt to do something really different will fail miserably, victim of ignorance and hubris. While there are no guarantees, these naysayers ignore:

  • the three CEOS and their staff are brilliant, powerful, have almost unlimited resources, and are very, very cognizant of the difficulties they face. These are as far from idealistic newbies as one could get.
  • the “competition” is pretty lousy, hasn’t delivered, and their incentives are NOT aligned with employers’. If the big healthplan companies could have figured this out on their own, you wouldn’t be reading this.  It’s not like A/B/J are taking on Apple, Salesforce, or the old GE.
  • the financial incentives are overwhelming; healthcare costs are over $24,000 per family and heading inexorably higher. Unless these companies reduce and reverse this trend, they’ll have a lot less cash for future investments.

Many are also talking about “initiatives” that are little more than tweaks around the edges; things like:

  • publishing prices and outcomes for specific providers aka “transparency”
    My view – research clearly demonstrates consumers don’t pay attention to this information, so there’s no point
  • using technology to monitor health conditions and prompt treatment/compliance
    My view – lots of other companies are already doing this, and this is by no means transformational
  • use buying power to negotiate prices
    My view – it’s about a lot more than price, it’s about value.

Here’s a few things A/B/J may end up doing.

  1. Own their own healthcare delivery assets.
    My view – Insourcing primary care, tying it all together with technology, and owning a centralized best-of-breed tertiary care delivery center would allow for vastly better care, lower patient hassle, and cost control.
  2. Buy healthcare on the basis of employee productivity
    My view – Healthcare is perhaps the only purchase organizations make where there is no consideration of value – of what they get for their dollars. To the Bezos’, Dimons, and Buffets of the world, this is nonsensical at best. They will push for value-based care, defined as employee productivity.
  3. Build their own generic drug manufacturer
    My view – No-brainer.
  4. Allow employees to go to any primary care provider they want, but require them to go to Centers of Excellence for treatment of conditions that are high cost with high outcome variability.
    My view – No brainer.

I’d also expect many more large employers will join the coalition, for the simple reason that they have no other choice.

What does this mean for you?

Do not discount this.

 


Jan
19

What’s going on with health coverage for poor kids?

The current clustermess in DC around keeping the government funded is just bizarre.

What’s most bizarre is politicians are holding poor kids hostage, which is the only way to describe what is happening.

Republicans are refusing to consider legislation – requested by the President – to address DACA as part of the budget resolution. This is a core requirement for many Democrats, as is long-term funding for CHIP.

Background – CHIP has long been a bi-partisan program, championed by Sen Orrin Hatch R UT among other staunch conservatives. It provides insurance for poor kids and pregnant women, and has been funded for decades with nary a blip. Till now.  CHIP has been unfunded since October; most states are about to run out of residual funds, which would throw about 8 million poor kids and pregnant women off the program – and leave them with no insurance. 

This makes no sense.  If the Childrens’ Health Insurance Program is re-authorized for a decade, it SAVES $6 billion.  There is NO fiscal reason to NOT re-authorize CHIP, just a political one. The GOP is using the re-authorization in an attempt to force Democrats to support a budget proposal that is anathema to many Democrats – and more than a few Republicans as well.

It appears likely that we’ll be forced into a government shutdown over this, which will end up costing taxpayers a LOT more money than if the party in power had just passed a budget months ago as it was supposed to.  In case you aren’t as nerdy as your author, there have been four separate continuing resolutions to keep the government funding since Trump was inaugurated – and there are NO plans by the Senate Appropriations Committee to discuss a budget for this year – or next for that matter.

Moreover, the Committee, which is dominated by Republicans hasn’t even bothered to hold a vote on a budget over the last year.

If this stuff makes you nuts, well, it should.

What does this mean for you?

Be very thankful you aren’t a poor kid.  And really mad about what this idiots are doing to poor kids. 


Jan
8

Monday catch-up

Lots has been happening, here are a few items that caught my attention.

WCRI’s been diving deep into hospital reimbursement. This is an issue I’ve been tracking closely – and I’d suggest you should too. I see hospital/facility costs and utilization as a major cost driver; hear from Carol Telles in a webinar Thursday January 18 at 1 eastern.

As we’ve noted here previously, work comp payers would do well to pay close attention to facility reimbursement and utilization; expect work comp, auto, and other P&C lines to become even more attractive to hospitals seeking revenues and margins.

Healthcare spending inflation actually slowed significantly last yearAn analysis by Kaiser Health News indicates trend in 2016 was 4.3 percent, higher than the overall 2.8 percent inflation rate, but a 1.5 point drop from 2015’s rate.  Notably, drug cost inflation was just above 1 percent (although that’s a lot higher than the double-digit drop we’ve seen in workers’ comp).

Key point – this slowdown in the rate of growth occurred after ACA implementation.  Not surprising that costs went up; we insured millions more people, most of which had pent-up demand for services they couldn’t get or couldn’t afford.

While costs continue to grow, life expectancy declines. We have the most expensive healthcare in the world – by far – yet our life expectancy has dropped two years in a row. As a result, we rank 26th out of 37 developed countries for life expectancy.

Here’s why – we’re paying hundreds of billions for low-value care…

An excellent piece on how to make analytics actually work from Harvard Business Review.  Key points:

  • attach an ROI to the analytics unit itself
  • hire experts from OUTSIDE your industry…

Enjoy your week.


Dec
14

It’s not a tax bill, it’s a healthcare bill

OK, a bit of hyperbole – but only a bit.

Here’s how the Trump Tax Bill will affect healthcare…

  1. Immediate $25 billion cut in Medicare spending followed by a total of $400 million over the next nine years
    This has to happen under “PAYGO” rules which require offsets in spending when revenues are cut (as will happen under the Trump Tax).  Medicare is NOT AN ENTITLEMENT, it is an EARNED benefit. Starting January 1, 2018, doctors, hospitals, and pharma are going to take the hit as Medicare will stop paying for some care delivered by doctors.
  2. 13 million (+/-) more people will lose health insurance
    If you can sign up AFTER you get sick, why would you pay premiums until you need insurance? The bill ends enforcement of the mandate, but insurers are still REQUIRED to take all comers. So, many younger and healthier people will not sign up, and when they don’t the “pool” of insured people will get older, less healthier, and therefore more expensive to insure.
  3. Individual health insurance premiums will go up about 10%
    So, Insurance companies will raise premiums by about 10% as healthcare costs for the older, less healthy population will go up.
  4. Drive insurers out of the individual and small group markets
    See above…
  5. Reduce drug development for “orphan” diseases
    Today pharma gets a major tax break for developing treatments for orphan diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy and Angelman syndrome. It appears that tax break goes away – and this will greatly reduce R&D. The tax credit has been cited as responsible for treatments for about 350 diseases; there are around 7000 in total.  Here’s one pretty amazing success story that will likely not be repeated due to the end of the tax credit.

With fewer people covered by insurance, and higher rates for those that are, we’re likely to see more insurers drop out of more markets.

The greatest impact will be seen several years down the road, when the overly-optimistic growth projections prove to be just that. Already, experts predict the Trump Tax Bill will add over a trillion dollars to our national debt. When that happens, there are going to be calls for massive cuts to ALL services – including Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.

What does this mean for you?

I’m thinking Medicaid for all by 2027.

 


Nov
10

Friday catch-up

Here’s a few things I missed this week – and a big thank you to you, loyal reader.

First, thank you to all the folks who reached out publicly and privately to offer condolences on my political campaign and thank me for running. I deeply appreciate each and every one of you, and cannot thank you enough.

It’s Veteran’s Day (observed) today – thanks to all of you who have served.

Okay, here’s the big news of the week…

The death of “Obamacare” was announced prematurelyACA signups are breaking records.

Enrollment is well ahead of any previous year, as in more than 50% higher in the first few days of the month. There are likely several factors driving enrollment:

  • grassroots organizations like Get America Covered, the Indivisible ACA Signup Project are doing a great job despite the Administration’s efforts to kneecap enrollment efforts (thanks Charles Gaba)
  • Costs for bronze plans for millions of Americans are actually very affordable; while the coverage is thin the cost is almost nil, making it an obvious “no brainer”
  • Loss aversion – as I’ve noted here before, people hate losing something more than they like getting something, so Trump’s continual blathering about the death of “Obamacare” is likely reminding many that they better sign up now.

I hate Purdue Pharma

And I don’t use that word lightly.

A very well-researched and written piece in the New Yorker about Purdue Pharma and the family that gave us the opioid crisis is required reading. If you want to know why 60,000 friends, family members, and neighbors died of drug overdoses last year, here is the answer.

China is a major drug supplier

And it’s unbelievably easy to get illicit drugs sent here from China.

Why large employers are buying healthcare directly

Because the outcomes are much more consistent and much better, costs are lower, and there’s a LOT of crappy medical care out there. There’s a movement among smart buyers to STRONGLY encourage their insureds to use specific providers for specific conditions, and that movement is going to explode.

Here’s a key takeaway:

While nearly all of the 450 spine patients who presented to one of the participating centers had been recommended for surgery by providers in their home markets, only 62% of the patients were found to be suitable candidates for surgery by the COE [center of excellence] sites. Instead of unnecessary surgery, activity-based therapies, pain injections, physical therapy, or weight loss were recommended by our providers.

Vacation is next week – I won’t be posting.

Enjoy the weekend!


Nov
3

GOP budget’s impact on healthcare

The budget resolution that Republicans are basing their budget on would cut $1.8 trillion from healthcare, mostly from Medicaid over the next decade.

The impact of this on healthcare would be akin to Harvey hitting Houston. 

We will leave aside Republicans’ wildly optimistic economic growth projections and Congress’ elimination of scoring by the CBO – but you shouldn’t. (from former Reagan and Bush economic adviser Bruce Bartlett, discussing GOP growth projections... “[it’s] wishful thinking.  So is most Republican rhetoric around tax cutting.  In reality, there’s no evidence that a tax cut now would spur growth.”

Instead, the plan would cut Medicaid funding by 30 percent over the next ten years and slash Medicare by another half-trillion dollars.

This is a massive cut, one substantially larger than those proposed in either of the GOP’s failed ACA repeal bills.

There are NO details on how these cuts would be made or which providers and beneficiaries would lose what. This is classic Washington; they don’t want to highlight any specifics because the lobbyists will flood their offices.

Without those details, it is clear that doctors, hospitals, clinics and therapists would all face massive cuts in Medicaid reimbursement, and millions of families and kids would lose coverage. 

If something like this becomes law;

  • doctors and hospitals are going to jack up prices and increase utilization for privately-insured patients,
  • insurance markets will be thrown into disarray as the budget blueprint slashes ACA subsidies, and
  • the health status of millions of kids will decline.

What does this mean for you?

IF something like this passes – which I believe is highly doubtful – the US healthcare “system” will be hugely disrupted, with major implications for employment, private insurance costs, and workers’ comp.


Sep
26

Susan Collins saves the GOP

With her announcement that she won’t vote for the Graham-Cassidy bill, Sen. Susan Collins (R ME) has ended GOP efforts to kill the ACA.

She also saved her party from the disaster that would befall it if the bill had become law.

here’s why.

  • millions of core Republicans would have lost health insurance coverage,
  • states that went for Trump in the presidential election would have lost billions in federal funds,
  • many of the people covered in the individual market in Trump states have pre-existing conditions; Cassidy-Graham would have allowed insurers to drastically limit their coverage
  • Key GOP states such as Arkansas and Kentucky would lose billions in Medicaid dollars over the long term

This doesn’t mean future efforts won’t seek to slash coverage for kids via cutbacks in the Child Health Insurance program (CHIP), limits on Medicaid, or thru budget machinations. But these will be much lower-impact, subtler moves that won’t be as potentially devastating to the Republican brand as Cassidy-Graham. CG would have shown core supporters the GOP’s “solution” to the healthcare mess was far worse than the current one.

So, what now?

Nothing much is going to happen with healthcare in Congress for some time.  That’s too bad, as ACA needs fixing – namely:

This would go a long way to giving certainty to insurers, certainty that would lower premiums and stabilize markets.

What does this mean?

While the result may be a failure to deliver on a core campaign promise, what’s really happened is the GOP didn’t do deeper and broader damage to itself.

 

 


Jun
16

Why are Senate Republicans hiding their health care bill?

OK, let’s set aside the partisanship to objectively consider that question.

Senate Republicans are writing a bill in secret that would:

  • change one-sixth of our economy,
  • cause at least 20 million Americans to lose health insurance,
  • eliminate thousands of jobs in healthcare, and 
  • significantly change the insurance many of the rest of us have.

Many Republican Senators have yet to see the bill. HHS Secretary Tom Price has not seen the bill. The President has not seen the bill. The Wall Street Journal is upset with the process. The Conservative Review reports Orrin Hatch (UT), the second-highest ranking Republican Senator hasn’t seen the bill.

Senate Majority Leader McConnell has crafted a process to repeal-and-replace ACA that:

  • eliminates Senate requirements for debate,
  • doesn’t allow members of his own party or any Senate committee to review the bill before it hits the floor, and
  • avoids an accurate assessment by the Congressional Budget Office.

When ACA was passed back in 2009, there was:

  • 25 days of open public debate on the floor of the Senate
  • 13 days of open committee hearings
  • consideration of hundreds of amendments
  • months of meetings of the Gang of Six – three Republican and three Democratic Senators

Then-Minority Leader McConnell had this to say about ACA’s passage in 2009:

“This massive piece of legislation that seeks to restructure one-sixth of our economy is being written behind closed doors, without input from anyone, in an effort to jam it past not only the Senate but the American people…”

What does this mean for you?

Are you OK with this?


May
9

Trump de-funds Drug Policy Office…WTF!

President Trump’s budget proposal kills the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

I cannot fathom how any responsible public servant could do this.

In the midst of a horrific opioid epidemic, where we need every possible tool to slow down the death train, he de-funds ONDCP? 

30,000 dead people, thousands of devastated communities, huge societal costs, dead moms and kids and drug-addicted newborns, fentanyl and elephant tranquilizers coming in from China and he de-funds ONDCP?!

ONDCP is the lead agency setting NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY.  This isn’t some obscure, useless federal agency – these people set POLICY – what the feds do, don’t do, how they work together, what they focus on, where they target their efforts.

Without ONDCP, there is no coherent, cohesive policy; we’ll have a bunch of federal, state, and local organizations tripping over each other, duplicating efforts in some areas while completely missing or ignoring others.

And don’t tell me this is just a wish list – this shows where the President’s heart is, where his priorities are and are not.

This is real, folks. I’ve made no secret of my fear of the Trump administration, I just cannot believe even Trump would do this.

Thank goodness this is too awful for some of his fellow Republicans. 

What does this mean for you?

I don’t even want to think about it.