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Sep
13

The biggest deal in work comp to date

Yesterday’s announcement that Carlyle is acquiring Sedgwick is a clear indication that the work comp services industry remains a favorite of private equity investors.

The transaction, which valued the giant TPA at $6.7 billion, far exceeds the previous record set by the ill-fated One Call deal. It also produced very healthy returns for previous owner KKR; it bought the company for $2.4 billion just four years ago.

A 180% increase in value over a brief four years speaks to Sedgwick’s successes over that period, a clear and compelling growth strategy, and strong belief in management, which remains an investor in the company. (To be clear, a big chunk of this value growth was also driven by two major acquisitions, discussed below)

Here’s my brief take on why Sedgwick sold for so much.

Management

I’ve crossed swords with CEO Dave North in the past, but no one can argue with the success he and his team has delivered. I’ve also come to know several senior management folks, and they are, to a person, impressive.

Strategy

Work comp is shrinking, and TPAs are perhaps the only segment of the industry that will benefit from that shrinkage.  As claim counts decline, more insurers are choosing to have TPAs handle more of their claims.

Sedgwick also increased its internal work comp services expertise and capabilities. One example – the pharmacy management program overseen by Paul Peak PharmD is delivering impressive results.

North et al embarked on a clear diversification strategy several years ago, a strategy evidently designed to continue the company’s growth by dramatically increasing its footprint internationally and in property adjusting. Sedgwick’s acquisition of Cunningham Lindsey and Vericlaim positioned the company to profit from climate-change driven events such as hurricanes, fires, tornadoes and the like.

Wise indeed.

Scarcity

I’d be remiss if I didn’t reprise my comments from a few weeks ago –  there just aren’t that many work comp services assets to buy these days. To be clear, Sedgwick is neither a Pinto or a Gremlin; far from it.

The services industry has bifurcated into really big companies – Mitchell, Genex, Sedgwick, One Call, and relatively small ones – MTI America, HomeCare Connect and the like. While there are several firms occupying the middle ground, overall the number of potential acquisition targets has shrunk dramatically.

Because the big companies are really, really big, relatively few PE firms have the financial wherewithal to buy them.

As a result, when assets do come to market, investors seem willing to bid up prices.

What does this mean for you?

There are ways to succeed and profit in a consolidating, highly mature industry.

 


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Joe Paduda is the principal of Health Strategy Associates

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A national consulting firm specializing in managed care for workers’ compensation, group health and auto, and health care cost containment. We serve insurers, employers and health care providers.

 

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