Opioid guidelines are about to get a whole lot better

In about ten days, providers and payers struggling with opioids will get a big hand up.

ACOEM will be releasing their just-completed Opioid Guidelines; they are comprehensive, extremely well-researched and well-documented, and desperately needed.

I learned about the guidelines from a presentation delivered by Kurt Hegmann MD MPH, Professor at the University of Utah and Chair of the Occ Med Division at the University of Utah’s Compensable Disabilty Forum.  In his spare time, Kurt is also responsible for ACOEM’s guidelines as the Editor-in-Chief, a role he’s filled for eight years.

Affable and engaging, Dr Hegmann walked the audience through the development process (quite rigorous, involving 26 professionals with NO conflicts of interest using the Institute of Medicine methodology), the research and (960) references behind the guidelines and the ranking/categorization of individual guidelines.

Here are a couple of takeaways.

  • Of the 220 pages, the vast majority are tables of evidence – some practitioners may peruse them, but most will focus on the couple dozen pages specific to individual treatments
  • The guidelines address acute and chronic treatment, with chronic defined as > 3 months
  • The detail, specificity, and depth of research and their application to guidelines are impressive indeed.  What these guidelines add to our understanding of what works, why, and what doesn’t is impressive by itself; how they blow apart pre-conceived notions of “appropriate” care and challenge long-held conventional wisdom was – at least for me – rather jarring.

    For example;

  • Other guidelines say it is Ok to be on safety sensitive jobs and take opioids – that is NOT supported by the research
  • The researchers found NO link between opioids and improved function – studies that show there is a link almost always use self-reported data.
  • No trials indicate opioids are superior for acute pain than NSAIDs.
  • The MAXIMUM dosage recommended is 50 MEDs (morphine equivalent dosage), significantly lower than most guidelines which use 100-120.  The reason is the research – there is a much lower risk at this level, with the data indicating a sharply higher risk profile for higher dosage.
  • Drug testing is recommended with a baseline and random tests 2-4x a year; the higher the dosage – more screening
  • Pain rating scales are all but useless as data points as lots of patients indicate their pain is a 10 and yet are working full time.  This is not possible, and indicates the uselessness of subjective ratings/scores/data.

Are they perfect?  No.  But that’s due to the lack of research on specific issues, and not to the diligence and perseverance of the developers.  If the research is solid, it is in the guidelines.

What does this mean for you?

A lot of confidence in the guidelines, and hope that we can begin to gain control of the epidemic of opioid overprescribing.

7 thoughts on “Opioid guidelines are about to get a whole lot better

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    • The new opioids guidelines will be published 3/17 as part of Reed Group DisabilityGuidelines (formerly MDGuidelines) which has treatment/workers comp/return to work durations. The treatments side, including the opioids chapter, is content provided by ACOEM. We’re excited to be getting these guidelines into circulation.

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