Insight, analysis & opinion from Joe Paduda

< Back to Home

Feb
17

COVID update

yes, things are getting better – but that’s not universal, as some states/regions are still dealing with the Omicron tsunami.

First, idiot alert…

An Oklahoma hospital was forced to lock down its ICU due to what can only be described as rampant idiocy.  From Medpage Today:

In a recent press release, [a] church group [that has been protesting outside the facility and making threats against its staff online], known as Ekklesia Oklahoma, called Mercy Hospital an “evil Marxist controlled death camp.” [emphasis added]

Court documents stated that the founder of the group called one of the hospital’s doctors a “murderer,” noting that members even posted the doctor’s home address online, according to KFOR.

It’s not just Oklahoma…in Boston, a neo-Nazi group protesting outside the hospital called Brigham and Women’s Hospital “anti-white.” The stupidity of the protestors is stunning, as is their twisting of facts.

As I’v noted multiple times, we have family members in emergency medicine/critical care.  These types of attacks happen every day, everywhere. Patients yell, scream, hit, spit on staff. Some patients’ family members call and make demands, cursing at staff who refuse to dispense ivermectin. They abuse them mercilessly.

And nurses and staff are supposed to stand there and take it.

Would you tolerate that in your job?

What does this mean for you?

These idiots and their enablers are destroying our healthcare system. Call them out. 

Facts

COVID infections are associated with much higher use of medications to address behavioral health conditions. That’s from a study published in the British Medical Journal. The study was conducted by the Veteran’s Administration and analyzed data on over 150,000 patients with a previous acute COVID diagnosis.

From the BMJ:

people with covid-19 show an increased risk of incident mental health disorders, including anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, stress and adjustment disorders, opioid use disorder, other (non-opioid) substance use disorders, neurocognitive decline, and sleep disorders. The risks were evident even among those who were not admitted to hospital during the acute phase of covid-19—this group represents most people with covid-19 [emphasis added]

Vaccinations are good

A UK meta-analysis focused on long-COVID found that individuals previously infected with COVID benefited from vaccinations, and those with COVID that got a vaccination did better than those without a vaccination.

  • Six of the 8 studies assessing the effectiveness of vaccination before COVID-19 infection suggested that vaccinated cases (1 or 2 doses) were less likely to develop symptoms of long COVID following infection, in the short term (4 weeks after infection), medium term (12 to 20 weeks after infection) and long term (6 months after infection).
      • Six of the 8 studies assessing the effectiveness of vaccination before COVID-19 infection suggested that vaccinated cases (1 or 2 doses) were less likely to develop symptoms of long COVID following infection, in the short term (4 weeks after infection), medium term (12 to 20 weeks after infection) and long term (6 months after infection).

      Finally, more support for the benefit of vaccinations for those previously infected with COVID.  

      A study published in the new England Journal of Medicine found that:

      Among patients who had recovered from Covid-19, the receipt of at least one dose of the BNT162b2 vaccine was associated with a significantly lower risk of recurrent infection.

      So, yeah, just because you had COVID doesn’t mean you don’t need the jab.

      What does this mean for you?

      Get vaccinated. 


Joe Paduda is the principal of Health Strategy Associates

SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL

SEARCH THIS SITE

A national consulting firm specializing in managed care for workers’ compensation, group health and auto, and health care cost containment. We serve insurers, employers and health care providers.

 

DISCLAIMER

© Joe Paduda 2022. We encourage links to any material on this page. Fair use excerpts of material written by Joe Paduda may be used with attribution to Joe Paduda, Managed Care Matters.

Note: Some material on this page may be excerpted from other sources. In such cases, copyright is retained by the respective authors of those sources.

ARCHIVES

Archives