Insight, analysis & opinion from Joe Paduda

< Back to Home

Aug
18

WCRI’s Primer on Behavioral Health Care in Workers’ Comp

is one of the most important papers WCRI  has published in recent memory.

Authors Vennela Thumula PharmD and Sebastian Negrusa PhD have produced a comprehensive analysis of the subject, one every work comp manager, claims exec, regulator clinician and risk manager should have within easy reach.

Among the topics addressed are:

  • How do you define behavioral health in the context of workers’ compensation?
  • What are psychosocial factors and can they be a barrier to recovery following a work-related injury?
  • How important is early screening for psychosocial factors and other mental health conditions?
  • What non-medical and medical interventions exist to help those with behavioral health problems?

I’m working my way through the study; it has reinforced my belief that mental health/behavioral health issues/concerns are likely the primary barrier to recovery.

Chief among these are psychosocial factors that may impede recovery;

      • poor recovery expectations
      • fear of pain\catastrophizing
      • perceived injustice
      • pessimism
      • general fearfulness
      • job dissatisfaction
      • lack of family/social support systems

Friend and colleague Bill Zachry has long noted that Adverse Childhood Events can be a key obstacle to recovery  – in fact research indicates victims of abuse are more likely to be disabled during adulthood.

The paper also provides state-by-state details on coverage of mental stress and psychotherapy issues and the status of BH specialists as treating medical providers.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t note Carisk’s David Vittoria has been a persistent voice advocating for increased focus on BH issues. (Carisk is an HSA consulting client)

The study is free for WCRI members; there’s a nominal cost for non-members. Get yours here.

What does this mean for you?

Read this paper.


One thought on “WCRI’s Primer on Behavioral Health Care in Workers’ Comp”

  1. fromChris Brigham MD
    Joe, thanks for sharing this information. To achieve positive outcomes, we must approach injuries with a “biopsychosocial” perspective, understanding the relationships of body, mind, and spirit. Often behavioral issues are more predictive of recovery than the severity of the physical injury. Unfortunately, litigation often perpetuates challenges that an injured worker may face. Understanding and managing behavioral issues, personality structure, and psychological issues are beneficial in encouraging resiliency and maintaining a positive focus. Joe, you assist all of us in bringing this to our awareness. Thank you.

Comments are closed.

Joe Paduda is the principal of Health Strategy Associates

SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL

SEARCH THIS SITE

A national consulting firm specializing in managed care for workers’ compensation, group health and auto, and health care cost containment. We serve insurers, employers and health care providers.

 

DISCLAIMER

© Joe Paduda 2022. We encourage links to any material on this page. Fair use excerpts of material written by Joe Paduda may be used with attribution to Joe Paduda, Managed Care Matters.

Note: Some material on this page may be excerpted from other sources. In such cases, copyright is retained by the respective authors of those sources.

ARCHIVES

Archives